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A Place to Be Navajo: Rough Rock and the Struggle for by WITH Teresa L. McCarty, Teresa L. McCarty

By WITH Teresa L. McCarty, Teresa L. McCarty

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Read or Download A Place to Be Navajo: Rough Rock and the Struggle for Self-Determination in Indigenous Schooling (Volume in Lea's Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education Series) PDF

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My involvement at Rough Rock does not span a lifetime, but 20 years is a long time. While I think I know the community well, I recognize there is very much I do not know and never will. My reading of Rough Rock's history and implications is open to critique and debate (Tate, 1997) . At the same time, basic tenets of researcher responsibility and concerns for social change demand close attention to authenticity and credibility in the account. I hope that this account will "ring true" to people at Rough Rock and those who know of their work (see Lomawaima, 1994, p.

As Thomas James indicates, families also maintained summer camps near their fields in the Chinle Valley. All of this is consistent with a diffuse and flexible sense of community and place. There seemed to be land enough for all, and people respected the use rights of others. Blair Tsosie recalled: The people moved into the mountainsduring the summer, then they would move back down .... People drank melted snow during the snow season. They also drank rain water. Sheep and horses drank it as well [and] people used it without fear when preparing food ....

Whenever two or more languages are involved, especially languages as typologically different as Navajo and English, the problems of translation are magnified . I present the English translations here knowing that, despite the labors of those who worked so long and so well to make them accessible to a wider audience, they fail to capture the PEOPLE, PLACE, AND ETHNOGRAPHI C TEXTS 15 richness and texture of the original accounts. I nonetheless hope that Navajo and non-Navajo readers will find meaning in the translated words.

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